Amaluna – Cirque du Soleil ★★★★

Amaluna is a poor adaptation of Shakespeare’s The Tempest, with a foolish narrative but who cares? There is a reason why Cirque Du Soleil is systematically fully booked, and it’s for the unique spectacle.

Cirque du Soleil is a 20-year-old internationally known Canadian institution and a worldwide theatrical production. The Royal Albert Hall is the right place for Amaluna. Its ceiling is as high as the public expectations, accentuated by the hypnotic sound and set design.

It seems girl power is a prominent theme, with women making 70 per cent of the cast.

Amaluna offers a female Prospero who causes a storm at sea bringing a bunch of male acrobats to the island. Her daughter Miranda falls in love with shipwrecked Romeo. The story is about first love although their romance is everything but convincing throughout the show.

Miranda performs in a giant water ball and seems to become aware of her body while executing a sensual act fluidly in the water, later joined by Romeo. It’s the only part where their romance seems plausible.

amaluna-act-water-bowl

Some elements of traditional circus are there with the two clownish lovebirds who bring a comic but irritating effect. Their loud omnipresence ruins the delicateness of the show; they are clearly here to fill the set changes.

The most striking act is ‘The Balance Goddess’. She built and balanced a giant mobile of palm ribs with an extreme precision, using only canes and toes. This performance might be the biggest challenge of the show yet the least dangerous. Lasting for 10 minutes with no background music, the tension is almost unbearable as 4,000 people hold their breath collectively praying for the end to come, fearful a small breeze ruins her performance.

It’s really hard not to enjoy the 33rd production of the Cirque du Soleil. Enchanting acrobatics and music make you forget the weakness of the plot. The Cirque du Soleil has really created a new dimension to the circus’ world. Show must go on!

amaluna-act-teeterboard

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